A Holiday Feast

robin-berry-winter-Normand-Watier2

Christmas isn’t quite Christmas without getting stuffed to the gills, is it? It certainly isn’t hard to do when you have two or more Christmas dinners to attend in the same day. While you’re mowing down on another helping of mashed potatoes, wouldn’t it be nice to know you’re giving the birds in your backyard the same star treatment? We’ve got a roundup of the top seven treats birds will go crazy for. (They may even inspire a carol or two from your sing-song feathered friends!)

  • A Sweet Tooth for Sunflower
    When in doubt, go for the ever-classic sunflower seed. It’s the turkey and gravy of all feasts – all birds love them. There are two kinds of sunflower seeds: black oil and striped. Black oil seeds have thin shells, making it easy for all kinds of birds to crack into them and chow down. So opt for the black oil seeds if you really want to attract a wide variety of winter birds at your feeder this holiday season.Santa Brings Safflower
    Hello, cardinals! These bright and beautiful birds absolutely love safflower seeds. Their shell is a bit difficult to break open, but cardinals, grosbeaks, chickadees and doves manage just fine.

    Make Merry with Millet
    It might seem festive to offer your feathered friends red millet for Christmas, but birds undoubtedly prefer white to red. Millet is loved far and wide by ground-feeding birds like quails, doves, juncos and cardinals. Scatter a bit on the ground and watch them flock!

    Nijer for Noel
    Nijer is the luxe item on many birds’ Christmas lists. It may be expensive, but if you purchase a special nijer feeder for the seed, you’ll avoid a lot of waste – and that means more for the birds! The goldfinches, siskins and redpolls in your backyard will thank you!

    Stuff Their Stockings with Suet
    Insect-eating birds like chickadees, woodpeckers, jays and nuthatches find suet a special treat for the winter. Made from animal fat, it’s a great source of energy that keeps birds warm through the chilly months. You’ll definitely only want to keep it out if there’s snow on the ground, though. When temperatures rise, suet can quickly become rancid.

    CWF’s blends for small and large birds are certified and triple cleaned to help maintain healthy wildlife populations.

    Find out more or  Order now!

 

CWF

Author: CWF

Our mission is to conserve and inspire the conservation of Canada’s wildlife and habitats for the use and enjoyment of all.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *